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Technically 2014 hasn't ended yet, but that hasn't stopped someone from compiling the top searches on miiverse for 2014. That someone is Nintendo, who provides a neat online tool to see what the top searches are for the given year. The next update won't come until the end of December, but I don't see much changing in the list since it encompasses the entire year. Still, a year where no main line Zelda game released and Hyrule Warriors became the face of the series (in 2014), it's still pretty impressive. Next year we'll see if it can rise to the top...

YouTube star iJustine recently posted an interview on her channel that she conducted with Shigeru Miyamoto and Bill Trinen from Nintendo. She talked many topics, but, of course, the new Zelda game came up eventually. Check out what Miyamoto had to say...

I recently posted an article about an arrangement of Twilight Princess's "Hyrule Field at Night" and received some stimulating but conflicting responses about music in the The Legend of Zelda games. Naturally, discussion about Skyward Sword wasn't too far away, as it was the first of the series to feature orchestral music during gameplay. What interested me, however, was that some have argued that Skyward Sword featured only a few orchestral pieces (upwards of three), while others maintained that there were more than that. And that's the web I want to untangle. Exactly how much of Skyward Sword's music has orchestral music as opposed to digital music? Is there a clear answer? Have the composers even commented on such details? Does anyone really know?

Skyward Sword is a great game.

While watching the ending credits, I was reminded of all the fun I'd had in Skyward Sword's tremendous environments and colorful characters for 39 hours and 16 minutes. Many of the most satisfying moments of my Skyward Sword playthrough were found deep in its dungeons, or the instant I dealt a final blow to the end boss with only a lone heart and no health potions or fairies remaining. A smile was also brought to my face many times by Groose's antics, Peatrice's outrageous infatuation with Link, and the simple joy of rotating a boss key into position with the Wii Remote.

I finished my playthrough of Skyward Sword in 10 days, but this was not the first time I played the game...

We've all fallen in love with Koji Kondo's work on the Zelda series over the years, but we won't have his handy work to look forward to in Zelda U. In a recent interview with GameSpot, he explains how he won't be composing any of the music in Zelda U but will instead be supervising, suggesting he could be the overall sound director. While he has done this role many times over the years, he's almost always had his hand in at least one piece of music in each game, but that won't be the case this time around, as he'll let all the other talent create the music. Here is what he said when asked about his work on the next Zelda title...

The Zelda series is home to a vast variety of engaging enemies. From Skulltulas to Octoroks to Stalfos to Redeads, there really is no shortage of bad dudes for Link to slice to pieces. Many classic enemies from the 2D Zelda titles have found their way into 3D titles, most notably with this year's Hyrule Warriors, which reintroduced classic 2D bosses Manhandla and Gohma. This has had me thinking - what other 2D Zelda enemies are ripe for slaying in a 3D environment?

The Wind Waker is a Zelda game that should be fresh in our memories, given The Wind Waker HD and our The Wind Waker HD Walkthrough launched not so long ago. Today we're trying to figure out our fans top 2 dungeons from the game so they can advance to our finals, where we will be letting folks vote multiple times to determine our fanbase's overall Top 10 Dungeons. In our last poll it appears Ancient Tomb and Mermaid's cave have moved on from Oracle of Ages. I've included the rules for your convenience below...

Japanese sales tracker Media Create has added amiibo sales data to their weekly report, and it reveals encouraging news for Zelda fans. According to their estimate, 104,000 figures have been sold across all characters and Link is the most popular figure from the group, having sold 16,000 units in Japan alone. This reflects the sales data Nintendo released for November, where we learned that Link was also the best selling figure in the United States. Media Creates attributes the figure's success to Link's functionality in multiple games; not only do players get...

By now, most of you have seen the Game Awards footage of Zelda U - but have you seen the Japanese version? Even if you're like me and don't speak Japanese, this is still footage worth checking out. The audio is clearer because of the absence of the English dub, allowing us to make out extra audio details...

Nintendo Minute hosts Kit and Krista had the chance to interview the prolific composer of video-game music, Koji Kondo, whose list of works include several iterations from the Super Mario Bros. and The Legend of Zelda series. Kit and Krista’s subject for the interview was Kondo’s “compositional process.” Borrowed from scholarly discussions about music, the term refers to the methods and/or steps by which composers write a piece of music from conception to the finished product. In other words, it addresses the question: How do composers compose? As may be imagined...