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There are many beautiful pieces of The Legend of Zelda fan art floating around on the Internet, but self-taught Hungarian artist, Adam Scythe, has created a watercolour painting timelapse that truly is a masterpiece.

This box set lightning deal is technically "sold out", however, everyone who added it to their cart hasn't checked out. What that means is that if they don't check out in a short amount of time, the item becomes available again and is optioned to folks who add themselves to the wait list. If you add your name to the waitlist for the item, there is a chance you could get the Zelda Box Set for guides, valued at $180, for just $80. That's a really big and really rare deal for Zelda collectors out there. I don't have the Box Set myself yet, so I already have my waitlist claim in. Get yours in while there is still time...

I know around these parts IGN isn't necessarily viewed in a positive light, but when they happen to do something interesting when talking about Zelda it's almost always worth taking a look at it. Be it fan voting, editorials, or in this case a nice video feature. They break down the visual history of Link, and frankly they do a great job. It's neat see how much (or little) he has truly changed over the years and when certain aspects of his garb were introduced. Of course the feature isn't 100% perfect, but I'm the guy that mispronounced "Hylian" and "Fi". No one's perfect...

This has been a topic of debate in the Zelda fan base since 1998. We've written many editorials about it and even had it as a fairly recent Daily Debate topic when talking about Hyrule Warriors. As of today we now have an official stance from Nintendo, one that puts the entire debate to bed. Is Sheik a female? Is Sheik a male (through the power of magical transformation)? We now know. Bill Trinen, Nintendo's senior product marketing manager and the main guy we've seen publicly as the official translator for Shigeru Miyamoto in the United States, has given Nintendo's official stance...

Gotta go fast!

I've always admired speedrunners. Delving into a game's code to learn the intricacies and behind-the-scenes shortcuts to reach completion is an incredible feat, and it blows my mind when someone can beat a game in three hours, when it took me over fifty on my playthrough. Add Twitch user Bob_Loblaw_Law to that list of people I admire, not only for having an awesome Arrested Development name, but also for completing a 100% run of Skyward Sword in only eight hours, thirty-five minutes, and twenty-eight seconds. That's a new world record.

Although the actual speedrun is a tad old now, it's still an incredible feat to watch. Check it out inside.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was a fantastic game, filled with epic battles, an enormous world, and a...horribly flawed storyline. Over the past few months, we've reviewed numerous issues with the story and proposed methods through which they could have been resolved – all while trying to maintain the same basic story as in the game we got. It's one thing to provide a solution; it's another challenge entirely to do so in ways that the development team could have feasibly implemented. Sure, not every idea was that simple...but then, I made no promises that they would be.

All the work we've done has been segmented: we've dealt with one issue at a time, rewriting it as best we could. Even so, it should be clear by now that I've been writing these articles with an overarching perspective – after all, we've often taken aspects of previous articles to use later in the series. So today, since we've gone through all the major issues that I noticed, I figured it was a good time for a general recap.

Herein lies the entire reworked tale of Twilight Princess, replete with all of the changes that I've put forward over the course of this series. It's my hope that, by viewing all these changes in one place, you can see the vision that I've had for the game.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was a fantastic game, filled with epic battles, an enormous world, and a...horribly flawed storyline. Each week we'll be looking at one of these flaws to determine what went wrong and why, as well as to discuss ideas of how the tale could have been rewritten to fix these problems and strengthen the story as a whole. ...Preferably without drastically departing from the original storyline of the game, but I make no promises.

Standing on the outskirts of Hyrule, Ordon Village is Link's home and, therefore, the first area you explore in the game. While this could have set it up to become a location of major importance as the story progressed, the developers decided to go an entirely different route: ignore it, forget about it, and hope that gamers do the same. I mean, it's not like anyone actually pays any attention to storylines and arcs, especially not for a location...right?

*cracks knuckles* Heh, heh, heh... Well, Nintendo, actually...

With all the focus on a true blue multiplayer component in a new Zelda game, it's easy to forget that just because a game says it's meant for a single player, it doesn't have to be. There are some out there who remember, however, and two of these fans have created an outline for a multiplayer game of sorts in Skyward Sword. Head inside to check it out!

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was a fantastic game, filled with epic battles, an enormous world, and a...horribly flawed storyline. Each week we'll be looking at one of these flaws to determine what went wrong and why, as well as to discuss ideas of how the tale could have been rewritten to fix these problems and strengthen the story as a whole. ...Preferably without drastically departing from the original storyline of the game, but I make no promises.

Despite this being our third article on issues focused around the Ordon children, I actually had very few problems with the kidnapped kids themselves. They were mostly minor characters with minor roles, who completed their character arcs early in Link's adventure and stepped out of the spotlight without vanishing or becoming stagnant: Malo took over the store, Talo manned the lookout tower, and even Beth and Colin at least had different things to say as you continued through the game. Most of them were fine as-is.

Key word: most. Not all. One of the abductees completely failed to live up to her potential, which is even more disappointing given how strong a character she was in the first half of the game. Let's dive in and take a look at the child of Ordon whose role definitely deserved some improvement: Link's dear childhood friend, Ilia.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was a fantastic game, filled with epic battles, an enormous world, and a...horribly flawed storyline. Each week we'll be looking at one of these flaws to determine what went wrong and why, as well as to discuss ideas of how the tale could have been rewritten to fix these problems and strengthen the story as a whole. ...Preferably without drastically departing from the original storyline of the game, but I make no promises.

Last week we started looking at the issues related to the Ordon children, and this week we'll be continuing that discussion from a different angle: looking at how Link himself is affected by these characters and his relationship with them. ...Or, at least, how he's supposed to be affected. What actually happens brings about a severe dissonance between Link's goals and actions, completely undermining his character and rendering it much weaker than it should have been.

I can already hear the haters sprinting for the comments section...