Subscribe to the latest updates from the Wii category

Wii Archives

I recently posted an article about an arrangement of Twilight Princess's "Hyrule Field at Night" and received some stimulating but conflicting responses about music in the The Legend of Zelda games. Naturally, discussion about Skyward Sword wasn't too far away, as it was the first of the series to feature orchestral music during gameplay. What interested me, however, was that some have argued that Skyward Sword featured only a few orchestral pieces (upwards of three), while others maintained that there were more than that. And that's the web I want to untangle. Exactly how much of Skyward Sword's music has orchestral music as opposed to digital music? Is there a clear answer? Have the composers even commented on such details? Does anyone really know?

Skyward Sword is a great game.

While watching the ending credits, I was reminded of all the fun I'd had in Skyward Sword's tremendous environments and colorful characters for 39 hours and 16 minutes. Many of the most satisfying moments of my Skyward Sword playthrough were found deep in its dungeons, or the instant I dealt a final blow to the end boss with only a lone heart and no health potions or fairies remaining. A smile was also brought to my face many times by Groose's antics, Peatrice's outrageous infatuation with Link, and the simple joy of rotating a boss key into position with the Wii Remote.

I finished my playthrough of Skyward Sword in 10 days, but this was not the first time I played the game...

The Wind Waker is a Zelda game that should be fresh in our memories, given The Wind Waker HD and our The Wind Waker HD Walkthrough launched not so long ago. Today we're trying to figure out our fans top 2 dungeons from the game so they can advance to our finals, where we will be letting folks vote multiple times to determine our fanbase's overall Top 10 Dungeons. In our last poll it appears Ancient Tomb and Mermaid's cave have moved on from Oracle of Ages. I've included the rules for your convenience below...

Nintendo Minute hosts Kit and Krista had the chance to interview the prolific composer of video-game music, Koji Kondo, whose list of works include several iterations from the Super Mario Bros. and The Legend of Zelda series. Kit and Krista’s subject for the interview was Kondo’s “compositional process.” Borrowed from scholarly discussions about music, the term refers to the methods and/or steps by which composers write a piece of music from conception to the finished product. In other words, it addresses the question: How do composers compose? As may be imagined...

Koji Kondo has been around for a long time at Nintendo, so he's composed hundreds if not thousands of different songs for various games - either as the lead sound director or simply as someone who is part of a larger team. We've come to know and love many of his works over the years, with much of them being instantly recognizable when we hear them anywhere we go. Interestingly enough, The Legend of Zelda theme is among some of his favorite compositions he has ever created. Here's what he had to say when asked in a recent interview about his favorite music...

Which hand does Link favor? For the longest time, Nintendo portrayed Link as a left-handed hero. This representation held steady from the first game way back in 1986 all the way to the 2006 release of Twilight Princess. While Link is right-handed in the Wii version of Twilight Princess, but it isport of the GameCube version of the same game, where the entire game world (including Link's favored hand) is inverted from left to right. Official art for Twilight Princess also shows Link as a left-handed hero, so the Wii version bends but does not break the trend of left-handed Links.

However...

Nintendo is heading a for a banner holiday season as they continue to build off their positive and profitable Q2 earnings report, with an estimated tripling of profits since September bringing in 36.8 billion yen. Nintendo, based on estimations by Bloomberg and others, is on pace to meet and maybe exceed their fiscal 2014 projections of 3.6 million Wii U units sold, while Nintendo is expecting a billion dollars in revenue in the United States from amiibo alone. Nintendo is clearly on the right track and I am just happy that Link and all of his friends are a big reason for this turn around. The Zelda series has now...

One of my biggest disappointments with Skyward Sword was a sense that the game held my hand too often. Skyward Sword felt to me like one of those games where the tutorial never lets up; my sense of agency and freedom as a player felt stripped away because I felt like too many puzzles were explicitly explained to me either by Fi or the camera zooming to an objective. I want to be challenged, but I also want to have some idea of what I have to do in order to progress. A fine line exists between telling me what an item does, and a magic ghost woman flying out of my sword to explain exactly how I need to use an item the moment I enter another room... before I even see the puzzle, let alone get a fair chance at solving it...

A while back, a good friend of ours, Branden Casper, presented a nice editorial analyzing the reveal of Zelda U at E3 2014 and suggested the game could be a prequel to Skyward Sword. His basis mostly stemmed from Link’s garb and the technology presented. Now that we’ve seen more of the game I’m not inherently sure the game is a prequel, but I am positive that it is related to Skyward Sword in some fashion.

Man at Arms has previously created the Master Sword but have now decided to give into fan demand to create the Fierce Deity Sword, just in time for Majora's Mask 3D's release next year. It's a special crafted sword that required more work than most of their traditional sword designs. They even used two different metals for each part of the two sided curved blade, and it actually was one of the toughest blades to mold the edges on and create a smooth texture throughout just due to the various angles.  It's a really neat process and one that I am always interested in learning more about...