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Gotta go fast!

I've always admired speedrunners. Delving into a game's code to learn the intricacies and behind-the-scenes shortcuts to reach completion is an incredible feat, and it blows my mind when someone can beat a game in three hours, when it took me over fifty on my playthrough. Add Twitch user Bob_Loblaw_Law to that list of people I admire, not only for having an awesome Arrested Development name, but also for completing a 100% run of Skyward Sword in only eight hours, thirty-five minutes, and twenty-eight seconds. That's a new world record.

Although the actual speedrun is a tad old now, it's still an incredible feat to watch. Check it out inside.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was a fantastic game, filled with epic battles, an enormous world, and a...horribly flawed storyline. Over the past few months, we've reviewed numerous issues with the story and proposed methods through which they could have been resolved – all while trying to maintain the same basic story as in the game we got. It's one thing to provide a solution; it's another challenge entirely to do so in ways that the development team could have feasibly implemented. Sure, not every idea was that simple...but then, I made no promises that they would be.

All the work we've done has been segmented: we've dealt with one issue at a time, rewriting it as best we could. Even so, it should be clear by now that I've been writing these articles with an overarching perspective – after all, we've often taken aspects of previous articles to use later in the series. So today, since we've gone through all the major issues that I noticed, I figured it was a good time for a general recap.

Herein lies the entire reworked tale of Twilight Princess, replete with all of the changes that I've put forward over the course of this series. It's my hope that, by viewing all these changes in one place, you can see the vision that I've had for the game.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was a fantastic game, filled with epic battles, an enormous world, and a...horribly flawed storyline. Each week we'll be looking at one of these flaws to determine what went wrong and why, as well as to discuss ideas of how the tale could have been rewritten to fix these problems and strengthen the story as a whole. ...Preferably without drastically departing from the original storyline of the game, but I make no promises.

Standing on the outskirts of Hyrule, Ordon Village is Link's home and, therefore, the first area you explore in the game. While this could have set it up to become a location of major importance as the story progressed, the developers decided to go an entirely different route: ignore it, forget about it, and hope that gamers do the same. I mean, it's not like anyone actually pays any attention to storylines and arcs, especially not for a location...right?

*cracks knuckles* Heh, heh, heh... Well, Nintendo, actually...

With all the focus on a true blue multiplayer component in a new Zelda game, it's easy to forget that just because a game says it's meant for a single player, it doesn't have to be. There are some out there who remember, however, and two of these fans have created an outline for a multiplayer game of sorts in Skyward Sword. Head inside to check it out!

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was a fantastic game, filled with epic battles, an enormous world, and a...horribly flawed storyline. Each week we'll be looking at one of these flaws to determine what went wrong and why, as well as to discuss ideas of how the tale could have been rewritten to fix these problems and strengthen the story as a whole. ...Preferably without drastically departing from the original storyline of the game, but I make no promises.

Despite this being our third article on issues focused around the Ordon children, I actually had very few problems with the kidnapped kids themselves. They were mostly minor characters with minor roles, who completed their character arcs early in Link's adventure and stepped out of the spotlight without vanishing or becoming stagnant: Malo took over the store, Talo manned the lookout tower, and even Beth and Colin at least had different things to say as you continued through the game. Most of them were fine as-is.

Key word: most. Not all. One of the abductees completely failed to live up to her potential, which is even more disappointing given how strong a character she was in the first half of the game. Let's dive in and take a look at the child of Ordon whose role definitely deserved some improvement: Link's dear childhood friend, Ilia.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was a fantastic game, filled with epic battles, an enormous world, and a...horribly flawed storyline. Each week we'll be looking at one of these flaws to determine what went wrong and why, as well as to discuss ideas of how the tale could have been rewritten to fix these problems and strengthen the story as a whole. ...Preferably without drastically departing from the original storyline of the game, but I make no promises.

Last week we started looking at the issues related to the Ordon children, and this week we'll be continuing that discussion from a different angle: looking at how Link himself is affected by these characters and his relationship with them. ...Or, at least, how he's supposed to be affected. What actually happens brings about a severe dissonance between Link's goals and actions, completely undermining his character and rendering it much weaker than it should have been.

I can already hear the haters sprinting for the comments section...

Passionate Zelda fans Sal, Russell, Jason, and Diego are running a live stream on Twitch to raise money for Weekend to End Women's Cancer, an annual 60 kilometer charity walk. As I am writing this, Russell is playing through Twilight Princess while Sal is practicing for the race through Majora's Mask that he and Jason will be having later. The group will also be playing A Link to the Past, Ocarina of Time, Wind Waker HD, and Skyward Sword. If they receive enough donations, a little bit of Zelda II and Four Swords Adventures will be added. Click through to check out the stream and learn more.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was a fantastic game, filled with epic battles, an enormous world, and a...horribly flawed storyline. Each week we'll be looking at one of these flaws to determine what went wrong and why, as well as to discuss ideas of how the tale could have been rewritten to fix these problems and strengthen the story as a whole. ...Preferably without drastically departing from the original storyline of the game, but I make no promises.

Some of the biggest and most blatant issues with Twilight Princess revolve around how it handles – or rather, mishandles – some of its most important characters: the children of Ordon Village. We'll be covering these problems over the next three (that's right, three!) weeks, but to start with, we're only looking at a single scene: one which holds the utmost importance in the game...and which, in retrospect, completely fails at its task.

Without further ado, let's discuss the children's kidnapping.

One thing I think the internet can agree upon is that the tutorial in Skyward Sword was overly long, to the point it actually turned some people off. Of course, with reviewers and journalists out there like Tom McShea, it's understandable why the tutorials can be so lengthy. Unfortunately, it didn't stop those people from not understanding the controls (It's okay Tom, you're not all bad, but we'll never forget the whole Skyward Sword fiasco). However, for the rest of us, we're about to get some sweet relief, which started in A Link Between Worlds and will likely continue in Zelda U.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was a fantastic game, filled with epic battles, an enormous world, and a...horribly flawed storyline. Each week we'll be looking at one of these flaws to determine what went wrong and why, as well as to discuss ideas of how the tale could have been rewritten to fix these problems and strengthen the story as a whole. ...Preferably without drastically departing from the original storyline of the game, but I make no promises.

One of the most memorable and freakiest scenes of Twilight Princess, if not of the Zelda series as a whole, comes after you've at last rid Hyrule in its entirety of the Twilight. Upon meeting with Lanayru, you're treated to a tale of ancient times, when evil ran rampant in its pursuit of the sacred power of the Triforce. This story gave me chills the first time I saw it, and continued to do so even after I paused the game to go watch the scene on YouTube a couple dozen times (I was a timeline theorist! DON'T JUDGE ME).

(Editor's note: TOO LATE)

Looking back on it, though, I do have one major complaint related to this scene. I have nothing bad to say about the Legend! Nothing at all! I thought that thing was brilliant! But...I do have a problem with the expectations that it raised and, unfortunately, never lived up to.