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Fans of Zelda Informer, The Legend of Zelda games, and of video-game music may have heard the name Jeremiah Sun. Or they may have heard of his self-titled internet soubriquet “The Second Narrator.” He composes and arranges pre-existing video-game music, and he also develops his own games. In addition, Sun’s interests have spurred him to try his hand at digital-music production, which resulted in original soundtracks to the demo game Borealis and his own game, The Gentle Sword.

Yet what has garnered most attention, certainly among Zelda fans, is his most ambitious project to date, the one where he learned how to work with digital music: the Link’s Awakening (LA) orchestration. Sun orchestrated every single one of the 70 original tracks and virtually transformed the 8-bit soundtrack into something on par with an epic film score, replete with full orchestra and vocals. Talk about a monumental undertaking for someone who’s just learning to digitally orchestrate!

GameSpot got a chance to sit down with Eiji Aonuma and talk a bit about the current and future ongoings in the Zelda franchise. One of those topics covered a bit of both – using time mechanics from Majora's Mask in future Zelda titles. Aonuma was asked if any of those mechanics could return in a future, and Aonuma seemed to suggest one particular mechanic may return, so certainly some thought has already been put into it...

Aonuma was tasked by Miyamoto to replay the original N64 version of Majora's Mask and come up with a list of thins he would have done differently today. Not expecting to really notice much of anything, he ended up coming to an inpass over many of the design choices in the game, leading him to create a "What in the World" list, something that added to and passed around constantly during development. It appears to be one of the main guiding principles of the game, and is directly responsible for the Boss fight changes, where he has no idea "what in the world" he was thinking when he originally...

Despite being Eiji Aonuma's first major Zelda project that he ran, it appears Eiji Aonuma wasn't really that keen on making a 3D version, even with Ocarina of Time 3D on the table. However, Miyamoto was rather insistent it happen, practically demanding Eiji Aonuma to make it happen. In the end, everything worked out and not only was Miyamoto happy, so were the fans and Eiji Aonuma ended up having a good time...

While we don't inherently know what changes Tomomi Sano may be responsible for, we do know she had a direct role in the changes presented in Majora's Mask 3D to help gamers get through the game who might have given up on the experience the first time around. We noted she didn't beat the original game because it gives you a good frame of reference for what sort of changes she might be responsible for - such as potential changes made to boss fights, swimming, or the Bombers' Notebook. However, that's purely speculation. For now...

In general, most video games made today have a set order of accomplishing tasks, such as having a director. In fact, the director is often more important than the role of producer, since they manage and often control the entire direction of a game. This is true even in developing remakes and remasters. Oddly enough, Ocarina of Time 3D apparently didn't have an official director, while Majora's Mask 3D didn't get one until half way through development. While the credits do give three people director roles, I wonder if those were just last minute title assignments...

As we dive further into the new Iwata Asks with Mr. Aonuma, we're getting a clearer picture on many of the design principles behind Majora's Mask. One of those was to get rid of the inviting nature of Ocarina of Time and literally dare gamers to "beat me if you can". Arguably this is what lead to a really strong attachment by those that achieved the ultimate goal, though at times this very thought process also turned many gamers off. Here's what Eiji Aonuma had to say on the differences in approach between the two titles...

As it turns out, Miyamoto was willing to break his own time table for the betterment of the Zelda staff working under Eiji Aonuma while they developed Majora's Mask. While Miyamoto was the person who gave them the one year restriction, towards the end of development he softened and told Eiji Aonuma he could delay the release of the game. This was mostly because the team was working insane hours to try and meet the release deadline that might have been a bit unhealthy. Eiji Aonuma seemed to act as if he was insulted at the notion...

In a brand new Iwata Asks (the first one in almost a year!), Eiji Aonuma and the team behind Majora's Mask 3D had a lot to say about both the current game that was released just today, Majora's Mask 3D, and some of the development on prior games. In one of these examples, Eiji Aonuma claims that the team behind Ocarina of Time put everything they had into the game, but still came away with a sense of things being unfulfilled. Like they brought all these ideas to the table but could never fully explore them all. Eiji Aonuma went on to say...

It's difficult to imagine that Majora's Mask could exist without the use of masks. By its very name and nature, masks play a crucial role in the game's story and gameplay. In today's Iwata Asks, Zelda director Eiji Aonuma shared why his team chose to use masks as a central feature in the game. The choice to include masks seems like an obvious one to fans, and it would seem the choice was just as obvious for the development team...