Zelda Editorial and Articles from Zelda Informer
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Speedrunners, you may want to turn away from your screens. Things are about to slow down.

When I’m playing or replaying any The Legend of Zelda adventure, my personal style is to let things draw out and drag on for as long as possible.

I could be on the doorstep of Ganon’s castle. But wait, I’m still missing a heart container… turn around and come back later. My completionist philosophy might take me to the same caves half a dozen times throughout a game. It may cause me to walk in circles, talking to the same damn people over and over again. I may forget where I’ve already been or what I’ve already done. No matter, I wouldn’t have it any other way...

There are a lot of questions surrounding Breath of the Wild. It seems as if each time we get new information, we come away with more questions. Some of these questions have easy answers, some of them don’t. Whereas some can ask about the role that amiibo will play in-game—a question with a simple answer—there are other questions that require a bit more thinking and, in this case, don’t actually have an answer to them. Also, since a lot of the answers to these questions have been short, I’m doing a few that I thought I needed to answer! Aside from Breath of the Wild questions, though, we did receive a very interesting Skyward Sword that I think everyone wants the answer to,

Also, I apologize for the break from this. I really intended it to be a consistent thing. Sadly, that didn't happen and it's all my fault! I know, you're all terribly broken up about it, but worry not, both of you, for I have returned to write these answers to your burning questions!

Ever since Breath of the Wild’s debut demo at E3, there has been a lot of buzz surrounding what many people consider to be one of the possible focuses of the game in terms of its story—the Sheikah tribe. The Sheikah have always been shrouded in mystery ever since the tribe’s debut in Ocarina of Time with Impa, and, if he counts, Sheik, though his existence is little more than a cover story for Zelda as a way to hide from Ganondorf. From the events in Ocarina of Time, we gather that the Sheikah are charged with guarding the Royal Family from danger, and that the village of Kakariko used to be a Sheikah-only settlement, until Impa opened it to the public, as mentioned...

Back when I was in grade school, I wasn’t allowed to play video games during the week, lest my grades suffer. (Let’s face it, they probably would have.) Because of this, Friday was a special day. That marked the beginning of the weekend and I could play video games! However, beyond that, we had this kind of tradition in my household. We would go eat at our favorite Italian restaurant for dinner and then head across the street to Blockbuster. (For those of you youngins, Blockbuster was a movie/game rental company where you physically had to get up and go to in order to rent and watch a movie or play a game...

Emotions are a very personal thing. That being said, sometimes you are able to convey types of emotions to players through video games in a variety of ways. In addition to many of the on screen cues, music plays a heavy role in emotional impact. Emotional music is often associated with moments of great sadness or despair, but the range of emotions music can evoke from the player goes far beyond just those minute feelings.

The Zelda series has no shortage of emotional and impactful songs. These may or may not be among my favorite overall in the series, but they do make my cut for my top 5 emotional music pieces in the entire Zelda series...

Art style is a big sticking point in the Zelda series. Most of the major controversies surrounding the series, many of the “splits” in the fan base, all started with the wide variance in art styles. Keep in mind this is a series that has shifted art direction so many times it could be argued that it’s hard to pinpoint what exactly is the visual identity of the series is. Let’s look at a handful of the art styles used in this series to date...

Yesterday, my esteemed colleague and fellow Zelda Informer Podcast Host, Alfred, talked at length about howNintendo used faulty logic to eliminate GamePad features from Breath of the Wild. He goes on to note how useful even the basic inventory and map features can be and how the real reason was likely for harmony with Nintendo’s upcoming system, NX.

Needless to say, I disagree, though it’s important that when showing the other side of the coin I first understand the initial claims that were made. The meat of his argument stems from a solitary quote where Eiji Aonuma talks about the GamePad features being eliminated. Here is the quote and some of what Alfred had to say on the matter...

During Breath of the Wild’s E3 release spectacular, we learned a lot about the game. We finally got to see it in action as Nintendo's Treehouse explored the vast over-world and a few shrines. We were given quite a bit of information about the game. In fact, we had so much that our site was inoperable for quite some time due to traffic. However, there is one feature that is lacking from the game.

On June 15th, we learned that Nintendo would not be utilizing the GamePad screen as a map. In fact, we aren’t sure if there are any GamePad features available aside from using the screen to minimize the game, should you choose to play it that way. In an interview, Aonuma stated...

Under Eiji Aonuma and Shigeru Miyamoto’s watch, the Zelda series has certainly tried it’s hardest to innovate. It started with art style changes and a boat and has ranged from DS touch controls and trains to multiplayer experiences and motion controls. While all of these changes to the series in that of themselves are harmless, they represented an idea of change that primarily involved how a player physically controls Link. Even in A Link Between Worlds, probably the most traditional Zelda in the last decade, the game centered around a singular mechanic to make it stand out (wall merging).

When I look back on the games released since Ocarina of Time I tend to find a general theme that they are all bit around a singular idea or concept. Zelda stopped being about… Zelda, and started being built around single ideas. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, some of my favorite moments in all of video games have happened in these very titles, but it also represented a close minded approach to advancing the series. It wasn’t built around improving within, but in injecting a new concept and trying to fit the rest of the game around it...

After Nintendo first announced it would only showcase a single game on the E3 show floor this year, many fans expressed an initial doubt over the company's decision. Despite promises of "complete immersion" within the hotly anticipated title known then as Zelda U, these fans weren't sure if Nintendo could sustain attention with only one game in the spotlight. Luckily, as those show floor doors opened and hungry fans rushed to play the freshly announced Breath of the Wild, Nintendo's booth exceeded all expectations. 

The company did not merely show off a brand new game for the first time, it provided a fully realized experience that placed attendees directly into the expansive world of this new Zelda title. Nintendo's booth offered fans a kingdom's worth of sights, sounds, and surprises, extending far beyond the game itself. So, join us as we take you on a comprehensive tour of Nintendo's Breath of the Wild booth at E3 2016...