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For almost 30 years, the Zelda franchise has stood out as a truly unique experience. Very few games have even been remotely comparible. In my time working at GameStop, the only game I can remember anyone using Zelda as a comparison for how the game plays was Darksiders. So why would we want to take that away? Why would we want to make the next game in the series like everything else? Would that not take away from just how special it is? These are all valid questions that I plan on answering, but they can be summed up by asking, "Who said that we had to take that away to reach the next level?".

No matter how far away a new Zelda game is, or how little we know about the next entry in the series, thoughts and theories are always swirling in our minds. What will the next game be like? Will it be top-down or 3D? Will it be set in Hyrule or somewhere else? How in the world can we possibly know what will come next in the series? Welcome back to a set of articles designed to do just that: extrapolate on past Zelda games to inform us about potential future entries. To do this, I’m taking a close look at the Zelda timeline; in particular, each of the three eras: the Era of Decline, the Child Era, and the Adult Era. This time, we're looking at the Child Era.

They’ve had different names over the years and haven’t always functioned the same from game to game, but which heart-filling items do you prefer stuffing into your bottles: Fairies or Red Potions?

Some titles in the Zelda series have made this choice easier than others. Fairies in Ocarina of Time and Majora’s Mask always revived Link with full hearts, and Skyward Sword’s Red Potions (called Heart Potions in that game) could be upgraded to carry two servings per bottle...

Last week, we asked about your most disappointing plot moments in the Zelda series. Many of you expressed your disappointment with such things as Zant's character in Twilight Princess, missed romances in Skyward Sword, my knowledge of the Triforce, and much more. Today, however, we want to steer the conversation to more positive things and ask about your most fulfilling plot moments in the Zelda series...

Etsy artist Milkool has created something beautiful and absolutely appealing to the eye...

Fellow Zelda Informer writer Paul Grzelak recently talked about why we shouldn’t fear amiibo in Zelda U. He brings up many points, but his main argument is based around the fact that prior games have sold with required and/or optional hardware in the past and those ended up not hurting the Zelda experience. He’s spot on.

However, there are plenty of reasons why we should be wary of amiibo support in the title. In fact, it can be argued that amiibo is Nintendo’s way of doing something the rest of the industry is doing but attempting to mask it behind a physical product. Will amiibo define Zelda U? Of course not. It likely won’t define anything in any future title, but it can still have a negative impact. To understand how, we have to look back at how amiibo is currently used in ways that aren’t necessarily all that great as a consumer.

Call me crazy, call me ignorant, call me foolish, but I’ve long thought of handheld Zelda games as pocket-sized versions of a more authentic experience that only home consoles can deliver.

Consider the titanic hype drummed up when the then-untitled Twilight Princess was announced at E3 2004 to roaring crowds...

Nintendo will probably integrate amiibo into some part of Zelda U’s gameplay, but we shouldn't worry. While I count myself among those opposed to amiibo integration in Zelda U, a look at Zelda's history has convinced me we have nothing to fear.

Amiibo support in Zelda U won’t be a microtransaction scheme straight out of the Candy Crush Saga playbook, nor will we see major features like riding Epona or accessing dungeons restricted without player purchase of specific amiibo figures. In fact, amiibo integration in Zelda U will probably be much more familiar than many of us realize...

Fan theories, hypotheticals, and speculations have become a staple in the Zelda fan community. Whether they relate to the official timeline, character relationships, or an obscure part of Hyrulian lore, theories are popular points of discussion for fans. But even with all the discussions, how much do fan theories really matter in the grand scheme of things? How much should we value fan theories...?

Link has been known as a silent protagonist since the very first game that came out. Sure, over the years he’s had his various grunts and even audibly says “come on” in The Wind Waker, but he’s been one of gaming’s poster children for a silent protagonist. But is Link actually mute? Does he truly not say anything at all?

Link actually does speak and he speaks fairly often, but how come there is a perception that Link “shouldn’t be speaking” every time a comic, fan made short, or really anything related to Zelda comes into existence? Why do fans actually think Link is a mute...