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Under Eiji Aonuma and Shigeru Miyamoto’s watch, the Zelda series has certainly tried it’s hardest to innovate. It started with art style changes and a boat and has ranged from DS touch controls and trains to multiplayer experiences and motion controls. While all of these changes to the series in that of themselves are harmless, they represented an idea of change that primarily involved how a player physically controls Link. Even in A Link Between Worlds, probably the most traditional Zelda in the last decade, the game centered around a singular mechanic to make it stand out (wall merging).

When I look back on the games released since Ocarina of Time I tend to find a general theme that they are all bit around a singular idea or concept. Zelda stopped being about… Zelda, and started being built around single ideas. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, some of my favorite moments in all of video games have happened in these very titles, but it also represented a close minded approach to advancing the series. It wasn’t built around improving within, but in injecting a new concept and trying to fit the rest of the game around it...

After Nintendo first announced it would only showcase a single game on the E3 show floor this year, many fans expressed an initial doubt over the company's decision. Despite promises of "complete immersion" within the hotly anticipated title known then as Zelda U, these fans weren't sure if Nintendo could sustain attention with only one game in the spotlight. Luckily, as those show floor doors opened and hungry fans rushed to play the freshly announced Breath of the Wild, Nintendo's booth exceeded all expectations. 

The company did not merely show off a brand new game for the first time, it provided a fully realized experience that placed attendees directly into the expansive world of this new Zelda title. Nintendo's booth offered fans a kingdom's worth of sights, sounds, and surprises, extending far beyond the game itself. So, join us as we take you on a comprehensive tour of Nintendo's Breath of the Wild booth at E3 2016...

E3 2016 has come and gone and with that we have a slew of information about the next big Zelda adventure, Breath of the Wild. There were well over 10+ hours’ worth of streamed content for everyone this E3 plus all the in person experiences with the demo. So far we’ve seen at least a dozen interviews pop up with likely even more on the way. So, what exactly do we know about this title...

Breath of the Wild is the recently re-announced Zelda title coming out of Nintendo for both the Wii U and NX. I’m sure everyone has heard about it given it was the most talked about game during E3 week. There has been a lot of praise going around for the title from all corners of the internet, with some small pockets of criticism here and there over various aspects. No game can truly please everyone, as they say.

That being said, on the surface it’s easy to say that this title is hardly innovative. It uses ideas and gameplay concepts present in dozens of other games but are only appearing for their first time in the Zelda franchise. So sure, it’s brand new to the Zelda franchise, but it’s not really that impressive in the grand scheme of video games. Is that that true, though...

This particular E3 was very different for me. As Managing Editor of Zelda Informer, it was my job to "steer the ship" so to speak, because our Editor-in-Cheif Nathanial Rumphol-Janc would be on-location with the E3 crew. For the first time in a very long time, Zelda Informer was without its captain during this hectic conference. By the way, this was the biggest Zelda blowout we've seen yet. What a time for Nate to leave...

Welcome to Eating the Leftovers, a new editorial series where I, Alfred, take questions that didn’t make it into the podcast and give my thoughts on them. I’ll pick out the ones that stick out to me and write up my opinions on them and then you can enjoy what comes out! Or not. You don’t have to listen to me.

I’ve been playing The Legend of Zelda series for nearly 25 years. To say I grew up on this series would be the understatement of the century. Of that 25 years I have spent 18 years covering the series in some capacity on the internet. I am the definition of the for everyone stigma this series has ran under from day one. It appealed to me as a child, as a teenager, as a young adult, and now as I enter my 30’s.

The idea of this series being for everyone has been a driving force for the series’ relevancy and growth. Except slowly but surely, the series has stopped growing in popularity. There are many things we can attribute to this, but one factor I wanted to highlight was this idea that Zelda is created for everyone...

We understand Link as the hero, the sole savior of Hyrule, the one prophesied with the Triforce of Courage. But we also understand that he never truly does it alone. Through many Zelda titles, Link is aided by a trusty companion. They vary from side-kick to full blown plot devices, but they’ve always had a place at Link’s side one time or another. There also seems to be a correlation between the development of Link’s companions and the development of the franchise itself. To do that, we can take a look at each companion Link has had throughout a game and how directly he or she has impacted the story. This, however, means that temporary companions, such as Ricky, Dimitri, and Moosh from the Oracle Series will not count, as will mounts such as Epona and the Crimson Loftwing. As an aside, despite many of these titles having been out for a long time, a lot of these analyses contain spoilers because of their nature, so you have been warned. So let’s see the lineup...

A topic that has been debated on the site recently is the issue of Link being an established character of the franchise, or a player avatar meant to be a "link" to the games that he is the protagonist of. Whenever someone such as a staff member or fan suggests a major change be made to Link for whatever purpose, the standard counterpoint to this suggestion is the fact that Link is viewed as an established character such as the iconic Mario from Super Mario Bros., or Samus from the Metroid franchise...

Are we spoiled as Zelda fans? That’s a tough question because that term often carries some negative connotations. The very definition of the word contains completely negative references, so it’s not a term I like to use lightly. However, I bring it to the forefront after watching a couple weeks’ worth of reactions to the news that Zelda U has become Zelda U/NX and that the game has been delayed again to 2017 (a likely, but unconfirmed, 4-month delay).

I will go ahead and quote some of the reactions I have seen, but unless they are made by a more public figure I will leave the comments as anonymous. So you’ll see a mix of fans and more public media types reactions to this news...